How Many People Die Of The Flu In The United States Each Year?

How many people in the world die from flu each year?

The World Health Organization estimates that worldwide, annual influenza epidemics result in about 3-5 million cases of severe illness and about 250,000 to 500,000 deaths..

How many people have died from the flu in the last 10 years?

Even the deadliest flu season of the last decade, 2017-2018, had a lower death toll with an estimated 61,000 people dying.

What percentage of people die from flu?

The World Health Organisation estimates that between 290,000 and 650,000 people die worldwide every year from influenza-related causes. Further research by the University of Edinburgh suggests an average of 389,000 deaths per year. Of these, around 67 per cent are among people aged 65 and over.

How many people died from the flu in 1918?

The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.

How many people die in the US every year?

In 2018, a total of 2,839,205 resident deaths were registered in the United States—25,702 more deaths than in 2017. From 2017 to 2018, the age-adjusted death rate for the total population decreased 1.1%, and life expectancy at birth increased 0.1 year.

How long did the 1918 flu last?

The Spanish flu, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic caused by the H1N1 influenza A virus. Lasting from February 1918 to April 1920, it infected 500 million people – about a third of the world’s population at the time – in four successive waves.

Is Spanish flu still around?

‘The 1918 flu is still with us’: The deadliest pandemic ever is still causing problems today. In 1918, a novel strand of influenza killed more people than the 14th century’s Black Plague. At least 50 million people died worldwide because of that H1N1 influenza outbreak.

How many people died of the flu in 2019 worldwide?

Until recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated the annual mortality burden of influenza to be 250 000 to 500 000 all-cause deaths globally; however, a 2017 study indicated a substantially higher mortality burden, at 290 000-650 000 influenza-associated deaths from respiratory causes alone, and a 2019 …

How many people die from the flu 2020?

Between October 1, 2019 and April 4, 2020, the flu resulted in: 39 to 56 million illnesses. 410,000 to 740,000 hospitalizations. 24,000 to 62,000 deaths.

Who is at risk of dying from the flu?

Other people at high risk from the flu: Although all children younger than 5 years old are considered at high risk for serious flu complications, the highest risk is for those younger than 2 years old, with the highest hospitalization and death rates among infants younger than 6 months old.

How many cases of the flu in the US in 2019?

The most recent statistics, collected through the week ending January 25, 2020, report that there have been 19 million cases of influenza during US 2019-20 flu season. This is an increase of 4 million cases since the last report.

How many people die from the flu in the US 2019?

CDC estimates that influenza was associated with more than 35.5 million illnesses, more than 16.5 million medical visits, 490,600 hospitalizations, and 34,200 deaths during the 2018–2019 influenza season.

How many people die of flu in US each year?

While the impact of flu varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year. CDC estimates that influenza has resulted in between 9 million – 45 million illnesses, between 140,000 – 810,000 hospitalizations and between 12,000 – 61,000 deaths annually since 2010.

How do you die from the flu?

Flu can directly lead to death when the virus triggers severe inflammation in the lungs. When this happens, it can cause rapid respiratory failure because your lungs can’t transport enough oxygen into the rest of your body. The flu can also cause your brain, heart, or muscles to become inflamed.

What made the 1918 flu so deadly?

While the global pandemic lasted for two years, a significant number of deaths were packed into three especially cruel months in the fall of 1918. Historians now believe that the fatal severity of the Spanish flu’s “second wave” was caused by a mutated virus spread by wartime troop movements.